Airlines are debuting yet another new fee

Here are three of the week’s top pieces of financial advice, gathered from around the web: Airlines debut new fee“There’s a new snag at the airport catching fliers by surprise: the gate-service fee,” said Scott McCartney at The Wall Street Journal. The new fee is being used by United and American “to discourage travelers who buy their cheapest fare, Basic Economy, from bringing a carry-on bag that doesn’t fit under the seat.” With these cheap fares, passengers don’t have the right to store their bags in an overhead bin. If you try to bring anything that won’t fit under your seat, either on purpose or because you didn’t know about… Read More

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Forest Service, Idaho work to boost logging on federal land

BOISE, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service and Idaho have forged 10 agreements for logging and restoration projects on federal land in what officials say could become a template for other Western states to create jobs and reduce the severity of wildfires. Under the deals, Idaho foresters will administer timber sales on about 10,000 acres (40 square kilometers) the federal agency has on its to-do list but can’t complete because the money for the work is instead going to fight wildfires. So far this year, the cost of that fight has surpassed $2 billion — more than half the federal agency’s annual budget — during one of the worst fire… Read More

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Colorado’s pitch to build Hyperloop track from Pueblo to Wyoming would cost $24 billion

Colorado’s ambitious plan to build a futuristic transportation system that would sling travelers along the Front Range and into the mountains in minutes also comes with an ambitious price tag: $24 billion. In the state’s proposed route, named one of 10 global finalists this month by the Los Angeles-based Hyperloop One, the Rocky Mountain Hyperloop team gave that estimate for the 360 miles connecting Denver to Pueblo, Vail and Cheyenne. The routes, which include several stops, would be able to handle 45 million trips in 2040, and generate $2 billion in revenues per year, according to the state’s proposal. The impact on the area’s economy would be much greater —… Read More

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Hertz discriminated against Colorado job candidate with mobility impairments, lawsuit claims

The Hertz Corp. unlawfully discriminated against a man with mobility impairments who applied for a car sales position at the company’s Englewood branch office, claims a federal lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Friday. The lawsuit claims Hertz denied employment to Norman Newton “because of Mr. Newton’s disability and/or because defendant regarded Mr. Newton as having a disability.” Newton suffered a stroke in 2011, which resulted in him walking with the assistance of a cane or wheelchair, the lawsuit states. The claim states that in April 2014, Newton interviewed for a sales position in the Hertz car sales division with a sales manager at the Hertz… Read More

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Xcel and other Mountain West power providers move to join larger regional group

A group of 10 electricity service providers, including many that serve Colorado, said Friday it’s moving ahead to join a larger organization that would ultimately reduce customer costs. A timeline was also set that could finalize a deal by late 2019. Related Articles Cold weather won’t raise utility bills as much as it usually does in fourth quarter, Xcel Energy reports As expected, regulators approve part of Boulder’s utility plan, deny rest Xcel employees heading to Florida to help with hurricane recovery Can Denver cut its greenhouse-gas emissions by 80 percent? It will take 100 percent renewable energy Coal’s future as a power source in Colorado flickering The Mountain West… Read More

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Netflix pulls kids show as one scene shows too much

Top of the Order: “Maya the Bee and WHAT?”: It’s been a different kind of week for Netflix. For one thing, the video-streaming giant showed its has a pretty good sense of humor, as it issued what many have called the coolest cease-and-desist letter ever when it asked a Chicago pop-up bar to no longer use the Netflix series “Stranger Things” as the theme for its establishment. And on Friday, Netflix debuted the third season of “Fuller House,” the reboot of the old “Full House” series that my daughters are now planning on watching a minimum of 8 million times. (Thanks, Netflix.) Along with both of those, Netflix also found… Read More

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