Starbucks will open first ‘Signing Store’ to serve deaf customers

Starbucks announced on Thursday it is opening its first cafe in the U.S. with employees who are partially or fully deaf and can communicate using American Sign Language. The company is converting an existing Starbucks in Washington, D.C., into a Signing Store, set to open in October. Employees will wear aprons embroidered by deaf suppliers, and pins that say “I sign,” USA Today reports. “The store will create a distinctive retail experience for all customers, while offering a unique store format that promotes accessibility and offers employment and career advancement opportunities for deaf and hard of hearing people,” Starbucks said in a statement. Starbucks will hire 20 to 25 people… Read More

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Prime Day fueled record sales for Amazon — but also its rivals

Amazon’s Prime Day broke another sales record for the e-commerce giant this week, TechCrunch reports, but it also helped lift sales for other massive retailers by 54 percent, according to an Adobe Analytics report. Target held a one-day sale on Tuesday to rival Prime Day, and said the day was its biggest online shopping day of 2018, in terms of both traffic and sales. Walmart attracted shoppers by offering free two-day shipping and cutting prices on Google Home devices, to compete with Amazon’s Prime Day discounts on its Echo devices. Smaller retailers with sales under $5 million didn’t fare so well, seeing an 18 percent decrease in online sales on… Read More

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Europe’s idiotic war on Google

Not every trade war involves tariffs. The European Union’s record $5 billion fine against Google for antitrust violations involving its Android operating system is protectionism masquerading as consumerism. And the risk for America isn’t that the penalty will sink the U.S.-based technology titan — parent Alphabet makes that much dough every couple of weeks in revenue — but that anti-tech activists here will be encouraged to ramp up their attacks against the country’s most innovative companies. Coming just days after President Trump slammed NATO for skimping on defense, it might look like Europe quickly found a clever way to finance some additional military spending. But the EU’s actions against Google… Read More

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Europe’s idiotic war on Google

Not every trade war involves tariffs. The European Union’s record $5 billion fine against Google for antitrust violations involving its Android operating system is protectionism masquerading as consumerism. And the risk for America isn’t that the penalty will sink the U.S.-based technology titan — parent Alphabet makes that much dough every couple of weeks in revenue — but that anti-tech activists here will be encouraged to ramp up their attacks against the country’s most innovative companies. Coming just days after President Trump slammed NATO for skimping on defense, it might look like Europe quickly found a clever way to finance some additional military spending. But the EU’s actions against Google… Read More

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Hundreds Of European Passengers Stranded In Montreal After Level Cancels Flights

MONTREAL — During their two-week Canadian vacation, Jessie Brillouet and her three friends visited Niagara Falls and went whale watching in Tadoussac, Que. — but they’ve also seen more of Montreal’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau airport than they ever wanted to. When the Hungarian residents arrived at the airport last Saturday, they saw on the departures board that their flight to Paris had been cancelled, with no representative from the airline in sight. Brillouet and her friends were a few of the hundreds of passengers who were thrown into limbo after Spanish airline Level unexpectedly cancelled its Saturday and Monday flights from Montreal to Paris, citing “operational reasons.” After Monday’s plane… Read More

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Interior watchdog investigating Zinke’s role in land deal

The Interior Department’s deputy inspector general notified House Democrats on Wednesday that its internal watchdog has launched an investigation into a real estate deal involving a foundation started by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke in Montana and several developers, including Halliburton Chairman David Lesar. The probe will look into whether Zinke violated conflict of interest laws. The real estate deal involved his wife, Lola Zinke, signing an agreement allowing developers, including Lesar, to build a parking lot for a redevelopment project that could raise the value of land Zinke owned nearby, Politico reports. Critics say Zinke and his family shouldn’t be involved in any business deals with anyone connected to oil… Read More

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