After Denver hired homeless people to rake mulch and perform other day labor, more than 100 landed regular jobs

Jeffrey Maes didn’t expect to live on the streets in his 50s. He had started several businesses, but he says the last one, a remodeling company, went south just as he was stretched thin on four properties. He lost them all, he said, and ended up without a home — along with the realization that he was considered unemployable. But last year, he heard about a Denver-sponsored day-labor program that had helped friends get back on their feet. After nearly four years of homelessness, Maes gave it a shot. And on Tuesday, he spoke about how the Denver Day Works program has helped restore his pride — and helped him… Read More

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VA hospital in Aurora gets August 11 opening date as thorny congressional hearing looms Wednesday

WASHINGTON — After years of delays, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs plans to open a new hospital in Aurora on Aug. 11 — although Tuesday’s announcement is unlikely to spare the agency from criticism when several of its top officials appear Wednesday before Congress to talk about the troubled project. The unfinished hospital already is long overdue and $1 billion over budget, and, according to documents obtained last week by The Denver Post, there’s plenty of work left to do before it can treat patients. Related Articles Overdue and $1 billion over budget, Aurora VA hospital is still incomplete and will likely be understaffed, document says Dozens of surgeries… Read More

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Democrats accuse Trump administration official of “amnesia” on president’s vulgarity

WASHINGTON — Republicans struggled to get their stories straight Tuesday as President Donald Trump’s Homeland Security secretary became the latest GOP official to offer an inconclusive version of a meeting in which Trump is said to have used vulgar remarks that have been criticized as racist. Democrats accused Republicans of selective amnesia, as Kirstjen Nielsen testified under oath that she “did not hear” Trump use a certain vulgarity to describe African countries. “It was a meeting of 12 people. There was cross-talk,” she explained at a congressional hearing, but she didn’t “dispute the president was using tough language.” Under persistent questioning, Nielsen said she didn’t recall the specific language used… Read More

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Mitt Romney declines to say whether he’d run for Utah Senate seat

SALT LAKE CITY — Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney declined to say Tuesday whether he would run for the Utah Senate seat being vacated by Republican Orrin Hatch, telling reporters the “time will come” for him to make some kind of announcement. Romney, who moved to Utah after losing the 2012 presidential election, repeatedly demurred when asked at a gathering of about 1,000 Utah business leaders in Salt Lake City whether he would run for office. “I don’t have anything for you on that topic today. Time will come,” the former Massachusetts governor told reporters after delivering a policy-laden speech and participating in a question-and-answer session at the event.… Read More

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Report: Adult film star worried Trump wouldn’t pay her

By Mark Berman | Washington Post An adult-film star who was reportedly paid to remain silent about a sexual relationship with Donald Trump a decade before he became president spoke to a journalist because she feared he would not pay up, according to a new account. Stephanie Clifford, whose professional name is Stormy Daniels, spoke to the online magazine Slate multiple times in 2016 before breaking off contact a week before the election, Jacob Weisberg, chairman and editor in chief of The Slate Group, wrote in a story published Tuesday. Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our new Morning… Read More

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Colorado lawmakers on course to fix pot-tax glitch that hit RTD and led to doomed special session

Three months ago, a special legislative session to fix a mistake Colorado lawmakers made regarding pot taxes disintegrated into partisan finger-pointing and blame. Now, with a new session underway, the discord is mostly resolved and the legislation to allow special districts to collect a voter-approved tax on recreational marijuana sales — one that lawmakers inadvertently repealed in May — is poised for easy passage. “We have a new solution,” said Senate Majority Leader Chris Holbert, R-Parker. “It’s a different concept, and I think that you’ll see that it will have sign more support than what we saw in the special session.” The issue extends from a measure lawmakers approved in… Read More

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