GOP plan to cut corporate taxes would lead to massive revenue losses, congressional accountant finds

By Damian Paletta and Max Ehrenfreund, (c) 2017, The Washington Post The primary congressional panel tasked with scrutinizing tax proposals has found that a three-year cut in the corporate tax rate would lead to a $489.7 billion drop in revenue over 10 years, creating more head winds for the ambitious tax cut plan that the Trump administration is working to craft. Related Articles Judge blocks President Trump’s sanctuary city funding freeze Trump’s budget could mean stormy waters for the Coast Guard’s big Bay Area presence The finding, presented to House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., in a letter from the Joint Committee on Taxation, found that cutting the corporate tax rate… Read More

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Denver police chief says more ICE agents on the streets, but his officers won’t do their work for them

Denver Police Chief Robert White said Tuesday that federal immigration agents have become “more assertive” since the Trump administration took office and that more ICE agents have been seen on the city’s streets. Still, White assured about 60 residents concerned about hard-line immigration enforcement that his department was not out to detain people living in the country illegally unless they have committed a crime. Then, they would be treated like any other criminal, he said. “We can’t police ICE and ICE can’t police us,” White said. “We’ve made it clear we’re not in the business of doing ICE’s work.” White spent an hour discussing his department’s immigration policy with a… Read More

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NAFTA Talks Amid U.S.-Canada Trade Drama Could Get Complicated

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s surprisingly caustic complaints about trade with Canada in recent days could be setting the stage for a broader renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement than previously advertised. Irritants like dairy, softwood lumber and drug patents could be on the table in the update to NAFTA, a far more comprehensive package than the minor tweaking the president spoke of a few weeks ago, his administration suggested Tuesday. Trump’s point man on the file explicitly linked all these individual disputes to the broader negotiation. In multiple public appearances Tuesday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross emphasized that the reason lumber and dairy have erupted as irritants is… Read More

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Delta levee and ratepayer protection bills pass first hurdle

DISCOVERY BAY — Two bills that would protect Delta levees and ratepayers were passed in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on Tuesday. Assemblyman Jim Frazier’s two bills — AB 732 and AB 791 — passed through their first hurdle. AB 732, which extends reimbursements for levee maintenance, passed on a 10-to-4 vote. AB 791, which requires Delta project leads to provide anticipated rate information, passed 8 to 6. Currently, 75 percent of maintenance costs for levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is reimbursed through the Delta Levees Subvention Program. That reimbursement is set to drop down to 50 percent in 2018. AB 732 will extend that 75 percent… Read More

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Transportation tax hike proposal reaches end of the road in Colorado

A bipartisan measure backed by Colorado’s top lawmakers to seek a sales tax hike for transportation reached the end of the road Tuesday. A state Senate panel defeated the proposal to inject $3.5 billion into improving the state’s highways along party-lines with the three Republican members citing ideological opposition to increasing taxes. The outcome became clear a week earlier when the Senate’s bill sponsors hastily announced an impasse in the negotiations on the term’s No. 1 priority, a major setback for legislative leaders and Gov. John Hickenlooper. “This is a statewide solution bill,” said Senate President Kevin Grantham, R-Cañon City. “Yes, it contains things both sides may cringe at. …… Read More

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Navarrette: Behold, America the complacent

SAN DIEGO — The headline grabbed my attention: “Americans have become lazy and it’s hurting the economy.” Lazy? Now there’s a four-letter word you rarely hear Americans use to describe themselves. Related Articles Editorial: Santa Clara County 1, Donald Trump 0 in fight to keep local police out of immigration enforcement Coming Wednesday: Live video chat with Leonard Pitts Jr. on Trump’s 100 days April 26 Letters: Let Ann Coulter and her ilk speak at UC Berkeley Robinson: Trump’s crumbling border wall fantasy Opinion: If Proposition 66 holds up in court, innocent people will die People were furious years ago when George W. Bush correctly surmised that immigrants “do jobs… Read More

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