Rev. Jesse Jackson says he has Parkinson’s

By Sophia Tareen | Associated Press CHICAGO — The Rev. Jesse Jackson disclosed publicly Friday that he has been seeking outpatient care for two years for Parkinson’s disease and plans to “dedicate” himself to physical therapy. In a Friday letter to supporters, the 76-year-old civil rights leader said family and friends noticed a change in him about three years ago. He said he could no longer ignore symptoms of the chronic neurological disorder that causes movement difficulties. Get tech news in your inbox weekday mornings. Sign up for the free Good Morning Silicon Valley newsletter. “Recognition of the effects of this disease on me has been painful, and I have… Read More

Continue Reading

Santa Clara County reports its first flu death of the season

A Santa Clara County adult under age 65 is the first flu-related death reported in the county this flu season, public health officials announced Thursday. The victim, who died earlier this month and had not received this year’s flu vaccine, had other medical conditions that placed the person at greater risk of severe complications from the flu, they said. Deaths due to laboratory-confirmed flu among anyone up to age 64 must be reported in California. But state medical privacy laws prevent any other identifying details about the individual — including their age, race, gender — from being released. County public health officials said no other cases of severe flu have… Read More

Continue Reading

Analysis: Trump’s pick to cut drug prices oversaw increases

By Carolyn Y. Johnson | Washington Post President Donald Trump’s pick for health secretary previously served as a high-ranking executive at a pharmaceutical company that repeatedly hiked the prices of its drugs, doubling the U.S. list price of its top-selling insulin over the five years he served as a company president. Related Articles Shortage of life-saving IV bags challenges Bay Area hospitals Rep. Blackburn draws fire over DEA-hampering bill Sen. Manchin calls Trump to pull drug czar nominee How the drug industry got the best of the DEA Trump endorsed Alex Azar, a previous Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services under President George W. Bush and pharmaceutical executive at… Read More

Continue Reading

Palo Alto entrepreneur brings tech savvy to an illness that hits home: ALD

Newly diagnosed with a deadly genetic disease, Palo Alto entrepreneur Ben LeNail walked into a conference of fellow patients and was stunned by what he saw: a tableau of young boys in wheelchairs, profoundly disabled and hopeless. In shock, he turned and walked back out. Then he stopped, and returned. And vowed to make a difference. “‘Go back and make friends,’ I told myself. ‘It’s the same disease,’” he said. “I realized that we’re not so far apart.” With limited time but enormous talent and Silicon Valley know-how, LeNail has shifted from grief to activism for those less fortunate, mobilizing his 25 years of technology and startup experience to accelerate… Read More

Continue Reading

Does sex trigger heart attacks?

Worried whether your heart is strong enough for sex? Relax — and go back to bed. A new study published this weekend shows that even though the chance of suffering a heart attack while having sex is greater for men than women, it’s still pretty rare overall. One in 100 men and 1 in 1,000 women had sudden cardiac arrest during sex, according to data published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Research led by Dr. Sumeet Chugh, associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, showed that after reviewing more than 300,000 cardiac deaths each year in the U.S., less than 1 percent were… Read More

Continue Reading

This amazing wristband could give the visually impaired a ‘sixth sense’

A new smart wristband aims to give the visually impaired a “sixth sense” to help them move around, said Peter Holley at The Washington Post. Some 7 million Americans live with a visual disability, and most rely on canes or guide dogs to help them navigate hazards. The Sunu wristband uses echolocation to notify the wearer of nearby objects. The device “emits a high-frequency sound wave that bounces off objects as far as 14 feet” away and then registers the objects’ location with a gentle, pulsing vibration on the wearer’s wrist. (Courtesy image) “The closer the object is — whether it’s a wall, trash can, or person — the more… Read More

Continue Reading