Gilroy native among 2 servicemen killed in World War II to finally be buried in California

MANTECA, Calif. (AP) — Two U.S. servicemen whose remains were identified more than six decades after they were killed overseas during World War II will finally get funerals in their California hometowns. The Defense Department says Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Homer Spence and Marine Corps Reserve Assistant Cook Frank Masoni will be buried Saturday with military honors. Spence’s funeral is in Manteca, and the service for Masoni is in Gilroy. The plane Spence was piloting disappeared during a mission over southern Germany in July 1944. He was 22. The wreckage was found in 2010, and Spence’s remains were identified using DNA analysis. Get breaking news with our free mobile… Read More

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His brother died mysteriously when they were toddlers. Years later, a photo changed everything.

By Kyle Swenson, (c) 2017, The Washington Post It was an old photo, the original sharp black and white tones worn down into the same muddy gray as television static. The young man, David Dearlove, sits against a brick wall, his legs spread on the grass, dark eyes on the camera, mouth hinged half-open in a grimace. The baby, Paul Booth, pudgy and blond, is propped against his right leg, his little feet in heavy socks and buckle shoes. A hand pinching his nose hides his face save for the eyes. Paul Booth’s body showed signs of abuse after his death. (Courtesy of Cleveland Police) The picture, snapped in the… Read More

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Watch: Blazing fireball turns night into day

By JAN M. OLSEN COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A blazing fireball lit up the dark skies of Arctic Finland for five seconds, giving off what scientists said was “the glow of 100 full moons” and igniting hurried attempts to find the reported meteorite. Related Articles Here’s your chance to help NASA build a home on Mars Scientists are tracking a giant, pink fire extinguisher in the sky How we’ll serenade aliens with music Look out, Elon, here’s competition! The Dream Chaser makes a successful flight Apollo 12 astronaut Richard Gordon dies at 88 Finnish experts were scrambling to calculate its trajectory and find where it landed, according to Tomas Kohout… Read More

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Navy says phallic skywriting over Washington “absolutely unacceptable”

Residents of Washington state turned their eyes to a clear blue sky Thursday and found themselves staring at a cartoonish rendering of male genitalia, sketched in smoke by at least one Navy EA-18G Growler jet flying out of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. The image stretched hundreds of feet high over the Okanogan highlands, based on photographs shared on social media. Lt. Cmdr. Leslie Hubbell, a Navy spokeswoman, called the incident “absolutely unacceptable,” saying it holds no training value and is under investigation. The unit involved, Electronic Attack Squadron 130, flies a two-person variant of the F/A-18 Super Hornet and specializes in electronic warfare. The aircrew responsible has not been… Read More

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Advocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increase

NEW YORK — At least 25 transgender people in the United States have been homicide victims so far this year, the highest annual total on record, according to advocacy groups that have been monitoring the grim phenomenon and seeking ways to reduce the toll. The Human Rights Campaign, in a report released Friday, calculated that 102 transgender people have been killed in the U.S. over the past five years — including 25 this year. Its report, jointly sponsored by the Trans People of Color Coalition, was issued ahead of Monday’s annual Transgender Day of Remembrance observations, commemorating the hundreds of transgender people killed worldwide each year. Another monitoring group, the… Read More

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This adorable baby beluga in Alaska slurps, head-butts and clicks at its rescuers

By Kitson Jazynka, Special to the Washington Post In a large tank filled with cold water, an orphaned beluga calf slurps and gulps with gusto six times a day. Feeding time for this bouncing baby boy in the 24/7 critical care unit of the Alaska SeaLife Center involves buckets, tubes and rubber nipples originally intended for livestock. Tyonek, as the 11-week-old is known, guzzles formula made from powdered milk substitute supplemented with salmon oil and herring filets and pureed in a Vitamix blender. The calf was rescued in late September after stranding on a quicksand-like flat on the remote western edge of a frigid arm of water near Anchorage. And… Read More

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