After RBG’s Death, Here’s How The Republicans Will Try To Screw Us

In the aftermath of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, public displays of grief have been rampant: Countless Americans are mourning the loss of RBG, a cultural icon who impacted the lives of so many women and marginalized people during her 27-year tenure on the Supreme Court. But alongside that grief is another powerful feeling: uncertainty. What is going to happen with the vacant seat on the Court? Within hours of her death, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pledged to hold a Senate-wide vote to nominate Ginsburg’s successor. President Donald Trump also tweeted at the GOP on Saturday morning to make his stance clear: “We were put in this… Read More

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A Florida bar owner is banning customers from wearing masks and asking them to leave if they do

Summary List Placement A sports bar owner in West Melbourne, Florida, has a no-mask policy for his customers amid the coronavirus pandemic, said he finds it “completely unnecessary to have facemasks at all. We do not support; we do not believe in them.” Gary Kirby, the owner of Westside Sports Bar and Lounge, started banning masks on September 11, placing a “Masks Prohibited” sign the front door. Kirby said anyone who refuses to take off their face coverings will be forced to leave the bar, WESH 2 reported.  “I personally don’t agree with it. So that’s why I made the decision to… I don’t want them here,” he said in… Read More

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg Was Not A Radical. But She Was Still Revolutionary.

When Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated from Columbia University Law School in 1959 and started her legal career, women in the U.S. were essentially second-class citizens, both “protected” and contained by the paternalism enshrined in state and federal law. Ginsburg, who died on Friday at the age of 87, helped dismantle this built-in misogyny, creating a much more solid foundation from which to fight the multiple attacks on women’s rights we are facing today. Part of what propelled Ginsburg toward the fight for equal protection for women under the law was her own experience of discrimination. As one of only nine women at Harvard Law School in 1956, the dean… Read More

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The physician accused of performing unwanted hysterectomies in an ICE detention center is not a board certified OB-GYN

Summary List Placement Dr. Mahendra Amin, the physician accused of performing unwanted or unnecessary gynecological procedures at an immigrant detention facility,  is not certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG), The Daily Beast reported.  On Monday, several immigration advocacy groups representing a whistleblower filed a complaint to the Office of the Inspector General, alleging “jarring medical neglect” and the occurrence of unwanted and unnecessary hysterectomies at the Irwin County Detention Center in Ocilla, Georgia.   In the complaint, Dawn Wooten, a licensed practical nurse who was previously employed by the center and is represented by Project South and Government Accountability Project, reported witnessing a large number of… Read More

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An Unlikely Friendship: Ruth Bader Ginsburg And Antonin Scalia

Watch Video Perhaps an odd couple.  Late Justices Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Scalia — a hardcore conservative appointed by President Reagan. Ginsburg — ruling with the court’s liberal wing. The two shared a unique friendship, serving on he Supreme court for 23 years together. They shared a love of the opera and travel. And a reverence for the law. One of Scalia’s sons, sharing on Twitter, a story that spoke to their friendship. This passage from federal Judge Jeffrey Sutton. Sutton says he saw two dozen roses Scalia was getting ready to bring to Ginsburg for her birthday. Sutton questioned the reason — if such acts of kindness… Read More

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