LISA WILTON

It’s safe to say The Sadies are one of Canada’s hardest-working bands.

Between racking up thousands of kilometres on the road and releasing 19 albums (including collaborations) in as many years, the veteran psychedelic country quartet are busier than many of their contemporaries.

So, it’s strange to hear Sadies guitarist and singer Dallas Good describe himself as lazy.

“Oh, this interview is the only thing I’m capable of doing today,” he says with a laugh.

Even if that was true, you couldn’t blame him for wanting to chill out. The band has had a busy summer playing festivals and recently finished a six-week tour of the U.S., opening for Justin Townes Earle. They’re currently on a two-week western Canadian trek — which stops in at Calgary’s Theatre Junction GRAND on Sept. 17 — and will head over to Australia and Europe in October.

“We stay busy because it’s all we can do and we’re happy doing it,” Good explains.

“But I can’t look at it as being gut-wrenchingly busy.”

The Sadies play Theatre Junction Grand on Sept. 17. Photo courtesy Heather Pollock
Heather Pollock

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The Sadies play Theatre Junction Grand on Sept. 17. Photo courtesy Heather Pollock
Heather Pollock

Good and his brother Travis formed The Sadies in 1994. Within a few years the band had developed a reputation in alt-country and independent music circles for their raucous, booze-fuelled live shows.

Those early, messy dive-bar gigs have been largely replaced by more sophisticated (but still-spirited and wildly entertaining) concerts in halls, theatres and outdoor venues that put more emphasis on their stellar musicianship.

“It does seem like a kind of gentrification compared to the beer-soaked shows we would once do,” Good says down the line from his home in Toronto.

“But we’ll …read more

Source:: Calgary Herald

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