Colorado’s top insurance regulator responded on Thursday to President Donald Trump’s health care executive order with concern, saying the policies endorsed could lead to flimsier coverage in the state and much higher costs for the sick.

“The limited benefits, the focus on the healthy at the expense of those with pre-existing conditions, and lack of regulatory oversight will cause problems for the health insurance market as a whole,” said Marguerite Salazar, the state’s insurance commissioner.

Trump’s order, signed Thursday, begins a process that broadly could reshape how Americans buy health insurance — especially if they do not receive coverage through their employers or the government. The order lacks specifics, leaving those up to administrative rulemaking processes that could take months. But the order endorses two big ideas for health insurance.

First, Trump’s plan looks to expand the use of what are called “association health plans,” which involve groups of businesses in a related industry that pool together to provide health coverage. It is possible that Trump’s order could lead those plans to be exempted from current federal laws requiring insurers to cover certain conditions such as cancer or addiction.

Second, Trump’s order proposes broadening the definition of short-term insurance — including lengthening the amount of time short-term plans can cover and allowing people to renew the plans once they finish. Short-term plans are not subject to some of the current federal requirements established by the Affordable Care Act.

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Source:: The Denver Post – Politics

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