Littleton students touched by recent teen suicides met this month to eat pancakes, play volleyball and soccer, and delete every social media app from their smartphones.

En masse on Oct. 1, about 150 students kicked off a month-long social media blackout by erasing Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and the rest from their screens. Since then, the “Offline October” challenge has grown to include 1,600 people at 200 schools in seven countries.

“We’re not saying social media causes suicide, because it doesn’t,” said Joe Roberts, junior class president at Heritage High School. “But it’s definitely a factor. People can become jealous and depressed. People are posting these perfect pictures and perfect tweets.

“We’re saying you can just be real with people. Talk face to face. If you are depressed, just be open about it. You don’t have to pretend your life is OK.”

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Roberts said he has spent more time hanging out with friends and calling them on the phone since …read more

Source:: The Denver Post – Business

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