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All of his pieces are attention-getters, but when different elements of his style combine – like his use of vibrant colors that pop like stained glass does when light hits it, along with his revered approach to figures who are black – it makes for art that’s sometimes transcendent.

When artist Nathan J. Taylor moved to Jersey City, it was during a time when Journal Square was what some might call bleak. But he’d lived in such places before, and he was glad to be there.

Signaling a shift in the area in general that had yet to take hold in Jersey City, landlords in other NYC-adjacent areas wanted Taylor’s work history and for him to jump through other hoops that were difficult for someone just starting out at Essence Magazine.

Taylor’s styles broadly range from varied approaches to canvas paintings to digital work, all of which he was able to hone in his off time as a designer for Essence. He’s also worked for Elle, the NBA, illustrated Iyanla Vanzant’s “Inspirational Card” series for Hay House, and created live paintings with musical artists like Janelle Monae and Kelly Price.

Nathan J. TaylorCourtesy Photo

All of his pieces are attention-getters, but when different elements of his style combine – like his use of vibrant colors that pop like stained glass does when light hits it, along with his revered approach to figures who are black – it makes for art that’s sometimes transcendent.

“The stained glass is definitely an inspiration for that style,” says Taylor. “I’m fascinated with architecture, and I love looking at churches – the way churches are built. And of course stained glass is in that, so a while ago I was thinking that I wanted to take that – the way the light shines through that colored glass; I wanted …read more

Source:: New Jersey Real -Time Entertainment

      

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