Chamberlain author photo--credit John Pagliuca.jpg

Time travel can be a hackneyed contrivance. Yet, of course, it has worked before, and in the hands of a master, it can be brilliant. In this, the time traversed is just between 1970, and 2001, then 2013. The word “just” though is deceptive. Consider the differences among those times.

Diane Chamberlain, who grew up in Plainfield and attended what was then Glassboro State College, has written her 26th novel.John Pagiluca

“The Dream Daughter”

By Diane Chamberlain

(St. Martin’s Press, 371 pp, $27.99)

Growing up on a steady of diet of bad TV in the 1960s, time travel conjures up idiotic plot lines such as T-Rexes chasing urbane dandies or pharaohs finding themselves in the middle of intergalactic traffic.

Time travel can be a hackneyed contrivance. Yet, of course, it has worked before, and in the hands of a master, it can be brilliant. In this, the time traversed is just between 1970 and 2001, then 2013. The word “just” though is deceptive. Consider the differences among those times.

Diane Chamberlain, who grew up in Plainfield, does a magnificent job of reminding us how technology transformed our world over these decades. Yet the heart of the book is a consistent beat: a mother’s fierce love for her child.

This opens in 1965 when our protagonist, Carly, working as a physical therapist, connects with a man no one else can. Hunter is not, as initially suspected, mentally ill. But he is from the near future.

Blessedly this does not contain any dystopian or utopian themes. Instead it is a look at what a desperate woman will do when given the opportunity to save her child. Carly withstood tremendous sadness by the time she was in her twenties.

Her parents were killed in a car crash when she was a young teen. Her sister, Patti, barely older …read more

Source:: New Jersey Real -Time Entertainment

      

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