LENINGRAD REGION, RUSSIA - OCTOBER 26, 2016: A cooling tower under construction at the LAES-2 Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant in the town of Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad Region. Peter Kovalev/TASS (Photo by Peter KovalevTASS via Getty Images)

Russia appears to be ignoring a request for information from the UN’s nuclear watchdog after it was accused of being behind a radiation spike in Scandinavia.
A safe but remarkable uptick in levels of three radioactive isotopes was observed in Sweden, Finland, and Norway last week. Dutch authorities said it came “from the direction of Western Russia.”
The International Atomic Energy Agency on Monday said it had asked European countries for data. Twenty-nine countries responded, but not Russia.
On Saturday, Russia’s nuclear energy operator denied it was the source of the leak and said its plants were all working as usual.
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Russia is yet to respond to a request for information from the UN nuclear watchdog after it was accused of being behind a radiation leak in Scandinavia.

Last week, authorities in Sweden, Finland, and Norway reported a minor uptick in levels of the Ru-103, Cs-134, and Cs-137 radioactive isotopes.

An analysis by the Netherlands’ National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (NIPHE) found that the radiation was coming “from the direction of Western Russia.”

On Monday, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said that 29 European countries had so far responded to a request for a situation report sent on Saturday — but not Russia.

The countries “reported to the IAEA that there were no events on their territories that may have caused the observed air concentrations of Ru-103, Cs-134 and Cs-137.”

While the increase in radiation is unknown, it is not dangerous, said Rafael Mariano Grossi, the director general of the IAEA.

“I expect more Member States to provide relevant information and data to us, and we will continue to inform the public,” he said.

The pattern of radiation, according to NIPHE, “indicates damage to a fuel element in a nuclear power plant.”

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Source:: Business Insider

      

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