Finding religion in the fine print

Here are three of the week’s top pieces of business insight, gathered from around the web: Finding religion in the fine print “How did God make it into millions of consumer contracts?” asked David Lazarus at the Los Angeles Times. Consider the one-year extended warranty offered by the eyewear chain LensCrafters. It excludes “‘damage from abuse’ as well as damage from ‘fire, collision, vandalism, theft, etc.’” But apparently that’s not enough: It also exempts damage resulting from “acts of God.” That would seem to include, “well, everything.” The roots of this clause can be traced as far back as a property-related case decided by an English court in 1581, which… Read More

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Microsoft plans to become ‘carbon negative’

Microsoft announced plans to become “carbon negative” by 2030, seeking to erase its entire carbon footprint since the company’s founding in 1975 and begin removing more carbon from the environment than it emits. The company first wants to reduce emissions to zero across its entire supply chain by 2030, and then focus on eliminating all of the carbon dioxide it has ever released by 2050, reports The Verge. Microsoft has been carbon neutral since 2012, and achieves this through purchasing renewable energy and carbon offsets. Going negative will require more technology and investment than going neutral. “Technology does exist that does this, but getting the price and the scalability to… Read More

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Disney is getting rid of the Fox in 20th Century Fox

An era in the film industry has officially come to an end. Disney is rebranding the 20th Century Fox film studio it purchased in its acquisition of Fox assets last year, Variety reports. Going forward, 20th Century Fox will instead be known as 20th Century Studios, and Disney will also rebrand Fox Searchlight Pictures as just Searchlight Pictures. Audiences will start seeing these changes fairly soon, as The Call of the Wild will reportedly be released next month under the new 20th Century Studios branding, although the opening logo complete with that iconic fanfare will be kept unchanged other than the altered name being swapped in. This decision, The New… Read More

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Sean Hannity, the biggest Trump insider at Fox News, says MSNBC and CNN are ‘state-run TV’

Most people think of “state-run TV” as propagandist television networks that are run by the government to boost the country’s leader and tell his (or her, but usually his) side of any news event. Fox News star Sean Hannity appears to have a different definition. Sean Hannity says MSNBC and CNN are “both are state run TV” pic.twitter.com/miHU9ZmhxN — Andrew Lawrence (@ndrew_lawrence) January 17, 2020 Hannity is one of President Trump’s most loyal and influential television boosters, along with Fox News host Jeannine Pirro and Fox Business host Lou Dobbs. They are all apparently in regular contact with Trump himself, and Trump makes it known publicly that he watches their… Read More

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BMO Promises ‘To Do Better’ After Indigenous Man, 12-Year-Old Arrested

VANCOUVER — BMO Financial Group is establishing an advisory council of Indigenous leaders from across the country after an Indigenous man and his 12-year-old granddaughter were handcuffed at one of the bank’s Vancouver branches. CEO Darryl White said Thursday the customer was not treated with respect or trust. “He entered our branch to open an account for his granddaughter and they were escorted out by police,” he said in a statement. “This is unacceptable.” Eight people have been appointed to the advisory council and BMO says it will be expanded from its initial membership to represent more First Nation, Metis and Inuit communities. Earlier this week, the Office of the… Read More

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U.S. Senate Passes New NAFTA Ahead Of Trump Impeachment Trial

WASHINGTON — The Republican-led U.S. Senate finally passed North America’s long-delayed new free trade pact Thursday, its final piece of legislative business before it transforms into a high political court of sorts for the impeachment of President Donald Trump. After passing the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives last month, the so-called implementation bill — the nuts and bolts of precisely how the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement will be executed, followed and enforced — cruised through the Senate by a margin of 89-10. Short of the president’s signature, which is expected as early as next week, the focus now shifts back to Canada. Watch: USMCA draws mixed support from Democratic presidential candidates The federal… Read More

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