Younger Canadians Not Interested In Raising Families In Condos: Study

Canada’s young families are giving up on the dream of owning a single-family home, but it’s not out of a desire to live an urban high-rise life — the cost has simply become too prohibitive. That’s the key takeaway from a new study carried out by Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, which found that, if money were no object, 83 per cent of young families would buy a detached home as opposed to any other type of housing. Only 5 per cent prefer condos. “The popular perception is that people in modern families have typically preferred multi-unit and city centre locations, when in fact what the report shows is if price… Read More

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Can the economy save the GOP from Trump’s toxic presidency?

Whatever else is wrong with the country these days, at least the economy is rolling along, right? Unemployment is low. Wages are rising. The economy is growing. And while there might be some concerns about inflation, as well as some wobbliness in the stock market, Republicans enter the midterm elections in decent position to offer a positive answer to a variation on Ronald Reagan’s famous question: “Are you better off today than you were two years ago?” For many Americans, the answer to that question is “yes” — financially, at least. And Republicans, understandably, are trying to make the most of it. “Nobody’s hot like we are,” President Trump said… Read More

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Canada Has A Historically Large Labour Shortage, But Job-Seekers Are Still Struggling

A record-high share of Canada’s small and mid-sized businesses are reporting they are being held back because of a skilled-labour shortage, but that doesn’t seem to be helping Canadians find work any faster. The Business Barometer from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) for October found nearly 47 per cent of small and mid-sized businesses are being held back by a lack of skilled labour. That’s up from 39 per cent a year earlier. “Business owners are finding it harder to fill vacant posts,” Ted Mallett, vice-president and chief economist at the CFIB, said in a statement. “It’s definitely a headwind for the economy,” Mallett told HuffPost Canada. “The… Read More

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Privacy Watchdog Probing Statistics Canada’s Request For Banking Data Of 500K Canadians

OTTAWA — Federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien says he is investigating Statistics Canada’s request for private banking information on 500,000 Canadians. Therrien said Wednesday that numerous people have complained to his office about the agency’s effort to gather detailed information on transactions held by Canadian financial institutions, from cash-machine withdrawals to credit-card payments to account balances. The formal investigation will include an examination of the requests Statistics Canada has made to businesses in multiple industries for data they collect on their customers and business partners, he said. Earlier: Watchdog weighs in on privacy laws, Facebook, and political parties Canada’s chief statistician, Anil Arora, said traditional methods of gathering data aren’t… Read More

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Trump is already preparing to blame Democrats for his souring economy

Publicly, President Trump is predicting that Republicans will maintain unified control of the federal government after next week’s congressional elections, but he also tweeted Tuesday that the stock markets, now back to where they started 2018, are “taking a little pause” because “people want to see what happens with the midterms.” This is part of Trump’s new “simple strategy if markets and the economy cool over the next two years: Blame Democrats and the Fed,” Politico reports. “In recent days, Trump and his senior advisers have repeatedly argued that recent turbulence in the stock market reflects investor fear that Democrats will retake the House in the midterm elections next week.”… Read More

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