Judith Butler on the culture wars, JK Rowling and living in “anti-intellectual times”

The philosopher and gender theorist discusses tensions in the feminist movement over trans rights. Thirty years ago, the philosopher Judith Butler, now 64, published a book that revolutionised popular attitudes on gender. Gender Trouble, the work she is perhaps best known for, introduced ideas of gender as performance. It asked how we define “the category of women” and, as a consequence, who it is that feminism purports to fight for. Today, it is a foundational text on any gender studies reading list, and its arguments have long crossed over from the academy to popular culture.  In the three decades since Gender Trouble was published, the world has changed beyond recognition. In 2014, TIME declared a “Transgender Tipping Point”. Butler herself has moved… Read More

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Podcast: In The Lap Of The Dodds

The New Statesman Podcast with Stephen Bush, Anoosh Chakelian and Ailbhe Rea. On today’s New Statesman Podcast, Stephen Bush, Anoosh Chakelian and Ailbhe Rea discuss Labour’s virtual conference and Anneliese Dodds’ speech. Then, in You Ask Us, they run listeners through the activities they’re trying to squeeze in before the second lockdown. Send us your questions for future episodes at youaskus.co.uk. You can subscribe to the podcast on Apple here or on Google/Android here. Listen here: GLYN KIRK/AFP via Getty Images Shadow Chancellor Anneliese Dodds on 21 September 2020 …read more Source:: New Statesman       

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Isolation and closed borders: Here’s how ten Pacific Island nations are COVID-19-free, and the costs that come with it

Summary List Placement Along with paradisical warm waters and golden sand, 10 Pacific Island nations are still completely COVID-19 free due to closed border and geographical isolation, but it has come at a cost. Samoa, Tonga, the Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Vanuatu, Micronesia, and the Solomon Islands, are all COVID-19 free, according to the Sydney Morning Herald These small island nations — that are also dealing with the daily impacts of climate change — managed to keep the coronavirus out by promptly closing their borders after conceding early on this year that their health systems were under-equipped to deal with an outbreak of the coronavirus. Australia Pacific Security College… Read More

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10 things in tech you need to know today

Summary List Placement Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Tuesday. Sign up here to get this email in your inbox every morning. Oracle has thrown fresh confusion on its deal to buy part of TikTok after saying that owner ByteDance will have no ownership stake in the new TikTok Global. In a statement on Monday, Oracle announced that its new TikTok venture will be entirely divested from ByteDance, contradicting previous reports of the agreed deal between the two companies, per The Verge.  Microsoft bought the massive video-game publisher behind game franchises like ‘Doom,’ ‘Fallout,’ and ‘The Elder Scrolls’ in a major coup that cost… Read More

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LAPD officers reportedly used facial recognition 30,000 times in the past decade, contradicting the department’s previous denials

Summary List Placement   The Los Angeles Police Department has on numerous occasions over the years downplayed its use of facial recognition technology, publicly claimed that the department doesn’t use it at all, and denied the existence of related documents that, if they exist, the public is legally entitled to see. But new records obtained by the Los Angeles Times revealed that the department has used the technology widely for more than a decade: 29,817 times between November 6, 2009, and September 11 of this year — including 3,750 instances since February. While the LAPD doesn’t have its own facial recognition software, 330 people within the department currently have access… Read More

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YouTube told content moderators to ‘trust in God’ and and take ‘illegal drugs,’ says a former moderator who sued the company after she developed PTSD symptoms and depression on the job

Summary List Placement A former YouTube moderator is suing the company over allegations that it violated California law by failing to provide a safe workplace and protect moderators’ mental health, which she said caused her to develop “severe psychological trauma including depression and symptoms associated with anxiety and PTSD.” In a proposed class-action lawsuit filed Monday, the ex-moderator claimed that YouTube, which is owned by Google, “failed to implement the workplace safety standards it helped create” and required moderators “to work under conditions it knows cause and exacerbate psychological trauma.” The ex-moderator, who is not named in the suit, worked as a YouTube contractor via a staffing agency called Collabera… Read More

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