10 things you need to know in markets today

US markets are closed to celebrate the Fourth of July. Here’s what you need to know in global markets today. 1. Chinese stocks hit their highest level in 5 years, while Europe looks for direction with US markets closed for July 4th. Liquidity was thin with few US investors online during the day. 2. Goldman Sachs says global oil demand won’t rebound to pre-coronavirus crisis levels until at least 2022. Gasoline demand is expected to be the fastest to recover among oil products due to a transition in consumer behaviour. 3. Chinese PMI hits the highest level in a decade in latest sign that the world’s 2nd largest economy is… Read More

Continue Reading

Google is closer than ever to having all the pieces for a wearables comeback, from a Pixel Watch to Glass 2.0. Here’s how it could play out. (GOOG, GOOGL)

This week, Google announced it is acquiring North, the Canadian startup behind the Focals smart glasses. You might have missed it: Qualcomm also just announced a new chip that will power the next generation of Google’s wearables. The pieces are in place for Google to get serious about wearable hardware – but it still needs to clinch the Fitbit deal. It’s not guaranteed to succeed. Antitrust regulators are concerned that the Fitbit merger could harm the market. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll have noticed that it’s been a big week for Google’s hardware plans. First, the company announced it is acquiring North,… Read More

Continue Reading

Judi Dench is just like us: She uses TikTok to break up the monotony of coronavirus quarantine

Judi Dench, the 85-year-old British actress, has recently appeared in TikTok videos thanks to her grandson, Sam Williams. In a recent interview, Dench told the UK’s Channel 4 News that taking part in sketches and dances on her grandson’s TikTok has “saved [her] life” during the pandemic lockdown. “Everyday is so uncharted. You wake up and you wonder what day it is, and you wonder what date it is, and sometimes what month,” Dench told Channel 4. “And then you think, ‘What do I do today?’” Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. TikTok has become a dire saving grace for billions of people locking down during the pandemic, including… Read More

Continue Reading

The 3 best luxury off-road SUVs for every price point

If you’re looking to extend your summer adventures further than paved roads, these three vehicles — priced from $40,000 to $130,000 — are the best picks to upgrade your ride. The 2020 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon can be loaded with a surprisingly high feature count and is tough on all driving ranges. The 2020 Land Rover Defender 110 X is more luxurious than the Rubicon and provides ample accommodations for up to seven passengers. The 2020 Mercedes-Benz G-Class is the top of the line, with a roomy interior and the latest tech and features. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. In a world stuffed with mall crawlers, there are still… Read More

Continue Reading

Amateur day traders had a field day with Hertz. Now, Morgan Stanley says Avis stock could be next and skyrocket 65%. (AVIS, HTZ)

After Hertz filed for bankruptcy, its stock became a playground for day traders hoping to capitalize on the volatility. The company’s lawyers even cited the gains as reason to sell more potentially worthless stock. Now, Avis could be next. Morgan Stanley upgraded the stock Thursday with an aggressive price target of $37. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. With its competitor Hertz in bankruptcy, Avis Budget Group is primed to scoop up market share. That’s great news for investors, Morgan Stanley says, and the stock could rise as high as $37 — more than 65% above its value at the time of the upgrade. The bank’s new thesis for… Read More

Continue Reading

The survival of small businesses in American college towns is being threatened as restaurants, bars, and bookstores are stuck hoping students return to campus this fall

Small businesses in university and college towns rely heavily upon students for their revenue. Some businesses make 80% or more of their income from university-related traffic. Business Insider spoke to restaurants, bars, and bookstores in college towns around the country to find out what it is like to operate during the pandemic — and what the uncertain road ahead looks like. If students don’t return to campuses this fall, or if they return in lesser numbers, some local businesses face the possibility of permanent closures. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. Late nights filling boxes with books, chocolate bars, and knick knacks until 2 A.M. is the new norm… Read More

Continue Reading