Supreme Court postpones hearing on Trump’s travel ban

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court has postponed for now a hearing on President Donald Trump’s power to ban immigrants from certain countries while it considers whether a new order issued Sunday night makes the case moot. In an order issued Monday, the justices asked for new briefs about whether the third rendition of the travel ban means there is nothing left for the court to decide. The briefs are due Oct. 5 and the court said for now it is removing from its oral argument calendar a hearing scheduled for Oct. 10. The Trump administration announced new restrictions on visitors from eight countries – an expansion of an existing travel… Read More

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Venezuela lashes out over travel ban

By Andrew Rosati and Vivianne Rodrigues | Bloomberg News Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza decried the U.S. travel ban on its officials and their families, saying the measure is the latest attempt by the Trump administration to force regime change in the South American nation. Related Articles Supreme Court postpones hearing on Trump’s travel ban Trump replaces travel ban with new restrictions Venezuela has been “threatened directly by the president of the United States,” Arreaza told the United Nation’s General Assembly on Monday in New York, called the U.S. as the world’s “major human rights violator” and saying that Trump acted “as if he were the world’s emperor.” Following his… Read More

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In Mexico, $2 per hour workers make $40,000 SUVs

MEXICO CITY — Auto worker Ivan Flores spends his days transporting parts for U.S.-bound Audi SUVs at a plant in central Mexico, but he laughs when asked if he could ever buy one of the $40,000 Q5 SUVs the plant produces on his $2.25 per hour salary. “For us it is a dream to buy a Q5; we never could,” said Flores, 40, who supports three sons on his roughly $110 weekly paycheck. The premise of the auto industry since the times of Henry Ford was that workers would make enough to buy the cars they produced. Across the U.S. and Europe, the arrival of an auto plant meant the… Read More

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Utah, state GOP battle over nominations at Denver-based federal appeals court

By Michelle L. Price and Kathleen Foody, Associated Press Utah Republicans pressed ahead on Monday with a legal battle that has divided the party for three years, arguing before a federal appeals court that a state law changing how political parties nominate their candidates is unconstitutional. An attorney for the state argued that the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals must balance the party’s right to determine its own procedures against the importance of broad participation by candidates. The lawsuit is the Utah GOP’s second attempt to chip away at the 2014 law, which allows candidates to bypass the party’s nominating conventions and instead participate in a primary. How… Read More

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San Jose’s senior homes measure is a bad idea

The voters of San Jose are about to be subjected to a truly insidious argument, one that subverts a generation of thoughtful planning. If you’ve ever wondered why it takes a longer than you’d like to summon a cop, get a book, or fill a pothole in our fair city, you’ll reject the plea outright. I’m talking about a measure that will be circulated in advance of next June’s election. Entitled “The Evergreen Senior Homes Initiative,” it sounds compassionate and timely. It is not. It would cheat the bulk of the city’s residents while enriching a few, repeating San Jose’s litany of land-use mistakes. Even more, it would reverse the… Read More

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What Republicans just changed in their health care bill

With the clock ticking and support stalling, Senate Republicans unveiled yet another Hail Mary on Monday in their effort to overhaul health care. WATCH LIVE: Senate committee holds hearing on Graham-Cassidy health care bill Republicans have until 11:59 p.m. Sep. 30 (the precise end of the fiscal year) to pass a health care bill using their ideal method: the “budget reconciliation” process, which allows some major legislation to pass with 50 votes, rather than the usual 60 required in the Senate. This bill, Graham-Cassidy 2.0, is an effort to win over key holdouts on the original bill the senators unveiled 12 days ago. It has many of the same key… Read More

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