Polis extends Colorado’s eviction protections ahead of federal moratorium ending

One day before a federal eviction moratorium expired, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis extended state protections, ensuring that tenants who are applying for rental assistance cannot be evicted for at least 30 days after the moratorium ends Saturday. Under an executive order that takes effect Aug. 1 — basically as soon as the federal moratorium expires — landlords must provide tenants with 30 days of notice before evicting them for not paying rent. During those 30 days, tenants can stop the eviction by showing they are awaiting money from a rental assistance fund. “The demand for this state and federal aid has been immense, and these programs need time to provide… Read More

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Dick Lamm, Colorado’s longest-serving governor, dies at 85

Former three-term Colorado Gov. Richard “Dick” Lamm died Thursday night at age 85, his wife said in a statement. Lamm would have turned 86 next week, but was surrounded by friends and family when he died of complications from a pulmonary embolism, according to wife Dottie Lamm. He had two children. The former Democratic governor served three terms from 1975 to 1987, the longest in the state’s history, according to the National Governors Association. He also was a state representative from 1966 to 1974. In the early 1970s, Lamm led a campaign for a successful referendum to put a stop to Colorado hosting the 1976 Winter Olympic Games, and also… Read More

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Biden to allow eviction moratorium to expire Saturday

BOSTON — The Biden administration announced Thursday it will allow a nationwide ban on evictions to expire Saturday, arguing that its hands are tied after the Supreme Court signaled the moratorium would only be extended until the end of the month. The White House said President Joe Biden would have liked to extend the federal eviction moratorium due to spread of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. Instead, Biden called on “Congress to extend the eviction moratorium to protect such vulnerable renters and their families without delay.” “Given the recent spread of the delta variant, including among those Americans both most likely to face evictions and lacking vaccinations,… Read More

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Congress passes bill to fund Capitol security, Afghan visas

WASHINGTON — Congress overwhelmingly passed emergency legislation Thursday that would bolster security at the Capitol, repay outstanding debts from the violent Jan. 6 insurrection and increase the number of visas for allies who worked alongside Americans in the Afghanistan war. The $2.1 billion bill now goes to President Joe Biden for his signature. The Senate approved the legislation early Thursday afternoon, 98-0, and the House passed it immediately afterward, 416-11. Senators struck a bipartisan agreement on the legislation this week, two months after the House had passed a bill that would have provided around twice as much for Capitol security. But House leaders said they would back the Senate version… Read More

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Amache internment camp preservation bill overwhelmingly passes the U.S. House

The U.S. House of Representatives voted Thursday to turn Amache, the former Japanese American internment camp in southeast Colorado, into a national historic site. The House passed the bill by a vote of 416-2, sending it on to the U.S. Senate. “Our nation is better today because of the lessons we have learned from our past,” said U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, a Windsor Republican who represents eastern Colorado. “The Amache National Historic Site Act is important because it recognizes the horrible injustices committed against Japanese Americans and preserves the site for people throughout Colorado and the United States.” Buck co-sponsored the bill with Rep. Joe Neguse, a Lafayette Democrat. Neguse… Read More

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Biden pushing federal workers — hard — to get vaccinated

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden is announcing strict new testing, masking and distancing requirements for federal employees who can’t — or won’t — show they’ve been vaccinated against the coronavirus, aiming to boost sluggish vaccine rates among the millions of Americans who draw federal paychecks and to set an example for employers around the country. Biden’s move for the federal government — by far the nation’s largest employer — comes in the face of surging coronavirus rates driven by pockets of vaccine resistance and the more infectious delta variant. A number of major corporations and some local governments are ordering new requirements on their own, but the administration feels much… Read More

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