White House seeks to clarify North Korea stance

By Matthew Pennington | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Trump administration clarified Monday that it’s not seeking to overthrow North Korea’s government after the president tweeted that Kim Jong Un “won’t be around much longer” and Pyongyang interpreted it as a declaration of war. Related Articles North Korea says it has right to shoot down US planes Trump’s threat to destroy North Korea plays into Kim’s rhetoric, experts say Trump threatens ‘total destruction’ of North Korea during UN speech Cartoons: Donald Trump, Rocket Man and the UN Ratcheting up the rhetoric further, the North’s top diplomat also argued Monday that Trump’s comment gives it the right to shoot down U.S.… Read More

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U.S. says it’s not pushing for regime change in North Korea

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration clarified Monday that it’s not seeking to overthrow North Korea’s government after the president tweeted that Kim Jong Un “won’t be around much longer” and Pyongyang interpreted it as a declaration of war. Ratcheting up the rhetoric further, the North’s top diplomat also argued Monday that Trump’s comment gives it the right to shoot down U.S. warplanes in international airspace. RELATED LINKSNorth Korea calls Trump comments a ‘declaration of war’ Trump’s travel ban unlikely to affect North Korea WATCH: At UN, Trump threatens to ‘totally destroy’ North Korea Trump’s Saturday tweet said: “Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N. If he echoes… Read More

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Colorado’s revenge porn law brings nearly 200 charges, but getting convictions is a challenge

A Colorado law designed to punish people for revenge porn — posting intimate photos of former lovers or spouses on the internet typically following a break-up — has resulted in nearly 200 charges since it was passed three years ago, but securing convictions and guilty pleas has been a challenge. There have been 192 misdemeanor cases for non-consensual pornography filed since House Bill 14-1378 became law in July 2014. Just over a third of those have resulted in guilty pleas or verdicts, reflecting the difficulty of proving the cases but also, possibly, weaknesses in the law. While law enforcement officials and victims advocates praised the law’s success, they remained measured… Read More

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Supreme Court postpones hearing on Trump’s travel ban

By Robert Barnes and Devlin Barrett | Washington Post WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court has postponed for now a hearing on President Donald Trump’s power to ban immigrants from certain countries while it considers whether a new order issued Sunday night makes the case moot. In an order issued Monday, the justices asked for new briefs about whether the third rendition of the travel ban means there is nothing left for the court to decide. The briefs are due Oct. 5 and the court said for now it is removing from its oral argument calendar a hearing scheduled for Oct. 10. The Trump administration announced new restrictions on visitors from… Read More

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Kurds in Iraq vote in independence referendum

By Tamer El-Ghobashy, Mustafa Salim and Kareem Fahim | Washington Post IRBIL, Iraq – Kurds packed polling station across northern Iraq on Monday in a historic referendum on independence despite vigorous opposition from the country’s central government as well as regional and world powers. Church bells tolled and imams implored Kurds to go out and vote over mosque loud speakers when polls opened across the Kurdish region, a wide swath of mountains, oil fields and desert that has been run as a semiautonomous enclave for decades. Local news showed prominent Kurdish figures casting their ballots, proudly displaying the purple voter mark on their fingers in what they described as a… Read More

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Supreme Court cancels arguments over Trump’s travel ban

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court has canceled arguments set for Oct. 10 in the dispute over President Donald Trump’s travel ban, after Trump rolled out a new policy Sunday. The unsigned order from the justices Monday asks both sides to weigh in by Oct. 5 about what to do with the case. The court had been ready to hear argument about the legality of a 90-day ban on travelers from six mostly Muslim countries and a 120-day ban on refugees from around the world. The ban expired Sunday and was replaced by a new policy that affects eight counties and has no expiration date. Those countries are Chad, Iran, Libya,… Read More

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