As Robert Mueller moves to finalize obstruction report, Trump’s allies ready for political battle

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump’s lawyers and special counsel Robert Mueller are hurtling toward a showdown over a yearlong investigation into the president’s conduct, with Mueller pushing to write up his findings by summer’s end and Trump’s lawyers strategizing how to rebut a report that could spur impeachment hearings. The confrontation is coming to a head as Trump and his allies ratchet up their attacks on the special counsel probe, seizing on a report released Thursday by the Justice Department’s inspector general that castigated FBI officials for their conduct during the 2016 Hillary Clinton email investigation. Rudy Giuliani, the president’s personal attorney, said that he planned to use the inspector… Read More

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Letter: High court ruling on flag burning may quiet anthem uproar

Those in uproar over anthem should know about high court ruling on flag burning Playing the national anthem at sporting events strikes me as an unnecessary and dubious affirmation of patriotism. The reason: thousands of attendees lack the control to stand quietly and respectfully during the brief presentation. Get editorials, opinion columns, letters to the editor and more in your inbox weekday mornings. Sign up for the Opinion newsletter. The current brouhaha ignores one of our fundamental rights, the freedom of expression (speech). In its 1989 decision, Texas v Johnson, the Supreme Court ruled, “Government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself… Read More

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Latest line: See our political winner and loser of the week

London Breed Raised by her grandmother in public housing, she becomes the first African-American woman elected mayor of San Francisco, edging out former state senator Mark Leno. David Valadao Bank seizes the dairy farm of San Joaquin Valley Republican congressman to resolve $8.3 million in unpaid loans for cattle and feed. He blames “burdensome government regulations.” Tim Draper Qualifies measure to split California into three states for November ballot, but chances of success are nearly zero; only 17 percent of voters support it and Congress would need to approve. Related Articles They said it: Why would Californians vote to split up the state? Latest line: Our political winner and loser… Read More

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They said it: Why would Californians vote to split up the state?

“Just ask them if they like being in last place. Last in quality of life. Last in education. Last in taxes. Last in infrastructure. Hard for the opposition to defend that record.” — Tim Draper, Silicon Valley venture capitalist, on his pitch to voters for his ballot measure to split California into three states, which qualified last week for the November ballot. …read more Source:: The Mercury News – Politics       

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Walters: Why two California lawmakers have been cast as traitors

Josh Newman, a Democratic state senator from Fullerton, was in a bitter mood when he rose on the Senate floor last week—for good reason. Six days earlier, voters in his district had decided overwhelmingly to recall him after just 18 months in office, persuaded by a tsunami of Republican allegations that he had betrayed them by helping to pass a hefty increase in gas taxes and fees last year. Get editorials, opinion columns, letters to the editor and more in your inbox weekday mornings. Sign up for the Opinion newsletter. “I can’t imagine wanting to win so badly that I would ever do, in the pursuit of partisan advantage, what… Read More

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President Trump will meet with House Republicans Tuesday to discuss immigration

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump will meet with House Republicans next week to discuss immigration – just days after his off-the-cuff remarks on the issue threw the GOP’s carefully-laid strategy into chaos. The meeting is scheduled for Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. and was confirmed by two House Republican aides who requested anonymity ahead of a formal announcement. Confronted by moderate Republicans demanding they take up immigration bills, House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and his leadership team had teed up votes on two measures next week: a hard-line draft written by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., and legislation billed as a compromise between the moderate and conservative factions of… Read More

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