Stop me if you’ve heard this: Weight loss is finicky

By Lindsey Tanner | Associated Press CHICAGO — A precision nutrition approach to weight loss didn’t hold up in a study testing low fat versus low carb depending on dieters’ DNA profiles. Previous research has suggested that a person’s insulin levels or certain genes could interact with different types of diets to influence weight loss. Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our new Morning Report weekday newsletter. Stanford University researchers examined this idea with 600 overweight adults who underwent genetic and insulin testing before being randomly assigned to reduce fat or carbohydrate intake. Gene analyses identified variations linked with… Read More

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Advocates for single-payer healthcare play the long game in California

By many measures, the rambunctious campaign for a single-payer health care system in California appears to be floundering. A bill that would replace the existing health care system with a new one run by a single-payer — specifically, the state government — and paid for with taxpayer money remains parked in the Assembly, with no sign of moving ahead. An effort by activists to recall Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon for shelving the bill has gone dormant. And an initiative that would lay the financial groundwork for a future single-payer system has little funding, undercutting its chances to qualify for the ballot. And by that metric, advocates are making gains. Riding… Read More

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Letter: State AG Becerra vows to protect patient drug data

The California Department of Justice must safeguard the rights and interests of nearly 40 million Californians. That’s why when it comes to requiring doctors to utilize a database containing sensitive, personal prescription drug information, we won’t sign off until we know it works and doesn’t leak (Editorial, Feb. 11). CURES puts patients’ personal information on the line. The updated system for collecting and sharing anyone’s personal data must be secure and functional before it is certified for mandatory use. This undertaking must be done right. Launching a mandatory tool before it’s ready makes people lose confidence in the system. No one wants a repeat of the Equifax data breach, where… Read More

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Bill would allow special needs students to use medical marijuana in California schools

SACRAMENTO — California minors with special needs or severe disabilities who rely on marijuana for medical purposes would be allowed to use the drug at their school under legislation introduced this week by state Sen. Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo). The measure would allow a parent or guardian to administer the drug in the form of oil, capsules, tinctures, liquids or topical creams on school campuses where the practice has been approved by the county board of education, Hill said. Interested in more coverage of the California marijuana industry? Head to TheCannifornian.com or subscribe to The Cannifornian newsletter to get cannabis-related news, features and more. Students in kindergarten through 12th grade… Read More

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Flu shot and ‘shedding’: Rumor about vaccine risk called untrue

By SETH BORENSTEIN WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting the flu shot won’t make you spread the disease more and doesn’t weaken your immune system but it does offer some protection from getting infected, despite misleading claims on social media. A post on a site called thewilddoc claimed that being vaccinated does more harm than good, citing a January peer-reviewed study. But one of the main authors of that study called the post “untrue” and “misleading,” not accurately interpreting the study. In January, Dr. Donald Milton and a team of researchers at the University of Maryland published a study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences about how the… Read More

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Breaking through the HIV vaccine ‘logjam’: UC Santa Cruz lab reports improvements that could prove game-changing

Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our new Morning Report weekday newsletter. SANTA CRUZ – When biomolecular engineer Phil Berman began his postgraduate work at UC San Francisco in the 1980s, he had no idea he would spend the rest of his career searching for a way to stop a deadly virus that was then almost entirely known. But around him, as if from nowhere, hundreds of people began to die. He has spent the past three decades looking for an effective vaccine against the AIDS epidemic that would claim more than 20,000 lives in the coastal metropolis alone.… Read More

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