Massachusetts is an exception to America’s coronavirus failure

America as a whole is in coronavirus hell. At time of writing, new cases were up 82 percent over the last two weeks, to almost 50,000 per day. Florida alone is routinely posting more new cases than the entirety of the European Union. While deaths have so far not spiked, it’s only a matter of time. However, it’s not entirely bad. A handful of Northeastern states have managed to get things under control — especially Massachusetts, which has managed a tentative reopening without seeing a spike in new cases so far, despite some significant anti-police brutality protests weeks ago. There the government did it by following expert guidance and learning… Read More

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America’s looming experiment in health-care rationing

Arizona on Monday announced its pandemic “crisis care standards,” which is a euphemism for rationing. If the state’s confirmed COVID-19 cases continue to trend sharply upward, as they have throughout the month of June, the standards will provide statewide triage rules for doctors determining which patients receive which treatments when resources are too scarce to provide ideal care to all. Such guidance is “not needed today,” said Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (R), “but we’re anticipating that it will be there in the future.” Arizona’s spiking caseload isn’t unique. Between 33,000 and 45,000 new U.S. cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed daily over the past week. The hospitalization rate has not… Read More

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Nobody knows how bad this coronavirus surge is

More than six months after the first case of the novel coronavirus was diagnosed in the U.S., and more than three months after we shut down large chunks of America’s economy to stop the spread of the disease, cases are surging once again around the country. Areas that were largely spared the worst back in the spring — primarily states in the South, Southwest, and West Coast — are seeing cases surge to record levels. In the case of Florida, daily confirmed case counts nearly match New York’s at the height of the crisis in early April. And yet, while the rest of the developed world (and big chunks of… Read More

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