A woman won a Nobel Prize, but science is still sexist

One of the 2018 Nobel Prizes in physics went to Donna Strickland, a major accomplishment for any scientist. Yet much of the news coverage has focused on the fact that she’s only the third female physicist to receive the award, after Marie Curie in 1903 and Maria Goeppert-Mayer 60 years later. Though biochemical engineer Frances Arnold also won this year, for chemistry, the rarity of female Nobel laureates raises questions about women’s exclusion from education and careers in science. Female researchers have come a long way over the past century. But there’s overwhelming evidence that women remain underrepresented in the… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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50 years after Apollo moonshots, will rivalry with China spark a new space race?

NASA astronaut Harrison Schmitt stands next to the U.S. flag on the moon with Earth hanging in the black sky above during the Apollo 17 mission in 1972. (NASA Photo) WASHINGTON, D.C. — An American rivalry with China could stoke a new space race in the years ahead, a space policy official and the last American to set foot on the moon said here today at a session marking the 50th anniversary of NASA’s Apollo missions. But it may not play out the way the U.S.-Soviet space race did, said Scott Pace, executive secretary for the White House’s National Space Council. Billionaire-backed space efforts such as Elon Musk’s SpaceX and… Read More

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Chandra X-ray telescope is back at work: Engineers trace glitch to 3 seconds of error

An artist’s conception shows the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. (NASA / CXC / SAO Illustration) NASA’s 19-year-old Chandra X-ray Observatory has been returned to its normal pointing mode after a data glitch forced a five-day outage, NASA said today. The bus-sized spacecraft went into safe mode on Oct. 10, bringing science observations to a halt. The Chandra mission’s operation team determined that the outage was caused by a fault in one of the gyroscopes used by Chandra’s pointing system. That fault resulted in a three-second period of bad data, which led the onboard computer to calculate an incorrect value for the spacecraft’s momentum, NASA said in today’s status update. The erroneous… Read More

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Hear Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen reflect on his life and legacy in rare public interview

Paul Allen speaking at Seattle’s Town Hall in 2011. (GeekWire File Photo) It’s hard to overstate the impact Paul Allen has had on technology, philanthropy and, really, the world. The Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist died at age 65 on Monday, but despite his vast array of interests and investments across the globe, he often shied away from the spotlight. In remembrance of his life, we are sharing a unique, candid interview between Allen and GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop, recorded at a live event in 2011. In the interview, Allen shares his outlook on Microsoft, the progress of technology, his relationship with Bill Gates, his first struggle with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and… Read More

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TLDR: Paul G. Allen (1953-2018)

GeekWire is sad to report that Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has died from cancer at the age of 65. Instead of the usual show format, we’re going to feature highlights from Allen’s speech at the 50th anniversary of the University of Washington Computer Science and Engineering School. He delivered this speech in March 2017, after he gave a $40 million gift to the school. Today’s featured stories Paul G. Allen, 1953-2018: Microsoft co-founder leaves legacy of innovation, philanthropy, bold bets Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen makes landmark $40M gift for University of Washington computer science school (March 2017) Years before giving UW millions, teenage Paul Allen was booted from school’s computer… Read More

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Facebook will delete posts that spread voting misinformation this election

Facebook today announced it’s tackling the most basic form of fake news to circulate around the time of an election: Voter misinformation and anything that might keep users away from the voting booths this fall. Specifically, the company revealed it would be removing posts that encourage “voter suppression” — anything that might deter or prevent people from voting. So posts that imply others shouldn’t vote, or attempting to feed them incorrect information on the voting process in their region, would fall into that category. According to Jessica Leinwand, the company’s public policy manager, basic misinformation about voting booths, voting dates,… This story continues at The Next Web Or just read… Read More

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