Working Geek: Neal Gottsacker brings Midwest how-to and startup lessons to Nintex

Neal Gottsacker, chief product officer for Nintex. (Photo courtesy of Neal Gottsacker) When Neal Gottsacker decided to take the role of chief product officer at Bellevue, Wash.-based Nintex, he was confident that it was going to be a good fit. He interviewed with a dozen people in a day during the hiring process, but instead of crawling out exhausted, “I walked away so energized from those conversations,” Gottsacker said. “What energized me the most were the people, the conversations and the very clear passion so many of these people have for the business and the customers.” He loved the non-bureaucratic, let’s-get-it-done vibe. It fit with his Midwest mentality. Coming from… Read More

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Working Geek: Neal Gottsacker brings Midwest how-to and startup lessons to Nintex

Neal Gottsacker, chief product officer for Nintex. (Photo courtesy of Neal Gottsacker) When Neal Gottsacker decided to take the role of chief product officer at Bellevue, Wash.-based Nintex, he was confident that it was going to be a good fit. He interviewed with a dozen people in a day during the hiring process, but instead of crawling out exhausted, “I walked away so energized from those conversations,” Gottsacker said. “What energized me the most were the people, the conversations and the very clear passion so many of these people have for the business and the customers.” He loved the non-bureaucratic, let’s-get-it-done vibe. It fit with his Midwest mentality. Coming from… Read More

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GPS satellites have a little-known ‘Millennium Bug’ problem of their own

Do you remember the panic surrounding the Millenium Bug? Computer programs, built when storage space was at a premium, would often represent years as two digits. 1998 would appear as 98, and so on. When the millennium arrived, these two-digit years would roll over to 00, with some programs interpreting this as 1900. While the Millennium Bug was resolved without incurring any real damage or disruption to businesses or users, the causes of the issue are frequently seen in other systems from the same era — GPS, for example. Designed in the 1970’s, the computer systems on the GPS satellites… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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Cheap all-display phones are coming to kill the notch

A good few months ago, TNW was utterly mesmerized by the Vivo Nex phone. This all-body handset concealed its selfie camera with an unusual pop-out mechanical mechanism. Although it didn’t make its way to the west, it was an interesting glimpse of what a post-notch future looks like. Why do I bring it up? Because MWC is around the corner, and French smartphone brand Archos is unveiling a phone that looks pretty bloody similar. Meet the Archos Diamond, which will retail at €300 when released. The Archos Diamond apes the aesthetic of the Vivo Nex, including that quirky pop-up mechanism,… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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Geek of the Week: An ocean lover on the surface, Parker MacCready’s unique science dives deeper

University of Washington School of Oceanography professor Parker MacCready. (Photo courtesy of Parker MacCready) When a series of big snow events set sights on the Puget Sound region earlier this month, traditional weather forecasts were all the talk as people in the path of the storms prepared for what was to come. Parker MacCready, a professor of Oceanography at the University of Washington, is in the forecast business, too, but his focus is on what’s happening beneath the surface of the water. MacCready and his colleagues at the UW are creators of a new computer model called LiveOcean which is designed to predict conditions three days ahead for the underwater… Read More

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Amazon-backed smart glasses maker North laying off 150 employees

North’s Focals smart glasses. (GeekWire Photo / Nat Levy) The same week North rolled into Seattle to show off its Focals smart glasses, the company cut a substantial portion of its workforce. RELATED: Worth seeing? We get fitted for Alexa-enabled smart glasses in a mobile showroom in Seattle The Verge first reported that North, the maker of new smart glasses that can send and receive text messages, communicate with Amazon’s Alexa and call a ride from Uber, laid off 150 people yesterday. The company website says it has more than 400 employees, indicating more than a third of the workforce has been let go. The Canadian company confirmed the layoffs… Read More

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