British-Indian team puts in a winning $1B bid for OneWeb satellite broadband venture

An artist’s conception shows OneWeb’s satellites circling the globe. (OneWeb Illustration) The British government and Bharti Global Ltd., which is part of the world’s third-largest mobile operator, have successfully bid more than $1 billion to acquire the bankrupt OneWeb satellite broadband internet venture. London-based OneWeb said the deal, resulting from an auction held this week in New York, will enable it to resume plans to add to its 74-satellite constellation and offer global internet access from above, starting with the Arctic. The sale still has to be approved by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court and regulatory authorities, but the transaction is expected to close late this year. “With differentiated and flexible… Read More

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The UK just paid $500M to battle Musk in the internet-from-space race — cos Brexit

A new challenger has appeared in the internet-from-space race: the UK government, which CNBC reports has committed $500 million to reviving bankrupt satellite startup OneWeb. The UK government won a 20% stake in OneWeb during an auction in New York on Friday, pending court approval. The bid, reportedly made through a consortium, was worth more than $1 billion in total. [Read: A look inside Europe’s $7 trillion technology market] The move sets the UK government squarely against billionaires Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, both of whom are pouring huge sums of cash into their own broadband-beaming satellite plays, Starlink and… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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Meet the ‘chief availability officer’: Salesforce names Seattle-area exec to unusual C-suite role

Darryn Dieken, chief availability officer for Salesforce. (Salesforce Photo) Salesforce, the San Francisco-based cloud company known for its flagship customer relationship management software, has created a new C-suite role: chief availability officer. And it has appointed as its first CAO, Darryn Dieken, who for more than three years has worked out of the company’s Bellevue, Wash., office as the executive vice president of infrastructure engineering. The somewhat squishy-sounding title is actually pretty literal, according to Dieken. It’s about making sure the company’s services are reliably up and running for customers, and that their customer’s services are, in turn, always available for their own customers. While individual Salesforce teams will still… Read More

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Google will host a Reddit AMA to answer developers’ questions about Android 11

Google wants to give developers a better idea of what they can expect from Android 11. In a post on the Android Developers subreddit, Google announced it’ll host an AMA with the community on July 9. If you were hoping to sneak in a question, you might want to hold your horses — unless you’re a developer at least. “Please note that we want to keep the conversation focused strictly on the engineering of the platform,” the announcement reads. “This is your chance to ask us technical questions related to Android 11 features and changes.” Google quietly dropped the public developer beta… This story continues at The Next Web Or… Read More

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Why girls are less likely to pursue a career in STEM — even though they score just as high as boys at school

Last month, the Australian Academy of Science published a report showing the COVID-19 pandemic would disproportionately affect women in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) disciplines. The report noted before COVID-19, around 7,500 women were employed in STEM research fields in Australia in 2017, compared to around 18,400 men. The authors wrote: The pandemic appears to be compounding pre-existing gender disparity; women are under-represented across the STEM workforce, and weighted in roles that are typically less senior and less secure. Job loss at a greater rate than for men is now an immediate threat for many women in Australia’s… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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Remembering the Boeing 747, the jumbo jet that started it all

According to people in the know, Boeing looks like it’s discontinuing its iconic 747 jumbo jet. In just two years time, the last of the twin-aisle jumbos will leave its Seattle-based factory. The news comes from a Bloomberg report that cites “people familiar with the matter,” who say the news hasn’t officially been announced to Boeing‘s employees but can be “teased out from subtle wording changes in financial statements.” I guess we’ll just have to take their word for it, for now. [Read: Remembering the Nucleon, Ford’s 1958 nuclear-powered concept car that never was] Here’s what Boeing told Bloomberg on… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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