Don’t believe the hype: There’s nothing wrong with the space station robot

CIMON, an AI-powered robot developed by IBM and Airbus, recently acted perfectly normal during interactions with human crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). A slew of journalists don’t agree with that assessment, but we’ll let you decide. When a crew member tried to ask it to do stuff it got confused, misinterpreted certain voice commands, and generally failed to produce the expected results with any consistency. Yep, sounds like business as usual. If you own a smart speaker, interact with a virtual assistant, or have ever played Zork (okay, maybe not that one) you know exactly how it feels… This story continues at The Next Web …read more Source::… Read More

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YouTube’s creators hit meme bingo in Rewind 2018

YouTube today released the 2018 edition of Rewind, its Year-in-Review performance art piece, in which it acknowledged the major trends on the platform. And no surprise, it was full of references to Fortnite, K-pop, and, of course, Drake. If you’ve checked any of the videos in the Trending tab in the past three or four months, you’ll probably recognize at least a few of the names: Ninja, the Try Guys, Lilly Singh, Liza Koshy, Safiya Nygaard, Marques Brownlee… Admittedly, the list of creators featured in the video was small compared with the Rewinds of years’ past, and the absence of some… This story continues at The Next Web Or just… Read More

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Xbox head Phil Spencer foresees expanded cloud gaming, and more game monetization options

Phil Spencer at the E3 2018 Xbox Briefing. (Xbox Wire Photo) The cloud will increasingly enable you to play the game of your choice on any device of your choice. So suggested Phil Spencer, head of Microsoft’s gaming division, at Barclays Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference on Wednesday, where he spoke in detail about expanding monetization and cloud technology as it relates to games. “If you think about content transformation, technology transformation, and business model transformation, they’re all happening simultaneously,” Spencer said. He used the massively popular game Fortnite as an example. Fortnite started on the PC platform, and then expanded to other devices, but Fortnite players are all… Read More

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NASA’s Mars InSight lander snaps selfies galore, including a name check for its fans

A photo snapped by the camera on the InSight lander’s robotic arm shows instruments on the spacecraft’s deck with Martian terrain in the background. The pointer indicates the location of two chips bearing the microscopic etched names of 2.4 million fans. (NASA / JPL-Caltech Photo) One week after landing on the Martian plain of Elysium Planitia, NASA’s InSight lander is on a selfie-snapping spree — and the photos could be used as a guide for 2.4 million Earthlings and their descendants to look for their names. InSight’s selfies aren’t meant to be a vanity project for the lander or its creators. Rather, they signal the start of a picture-taking campaign… Read More

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Thomson Reuters shuttering Seattle-area office of tech affiliate Legal Tracker as part of broader cuts

(Bigstock Photo) Thomson Reuters will close the Bellevue, Wash. headquarters of Legal Tracker, an online billing and analytics affiliate, as part of a larger series of layoffs and office consolidations. Legal Tracker itself is not going away, but the office will close next summer, and the headquarters will shift to Thomson Reuters’ Toronto office, spokesman Dave Moran told GeekWire. The office closure will affect roughly 60 people, though Thomson Reuters is still working through how many will be laid off and if any will transfer. Thomson Reuters filed a notice from the Washington Employment Security Department of the Bellevue office closure, saying that layoffs will begin in February. The move… Read More

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How climate change choked ancient life to death — and why it could happen again

An artist’s conception shows the desolation caused by the Permian-Triassic extinction more than 250 million years ago. (LPI / USRA Illustration) Scientists say rapidly warming oceans played a key role in the world’s biggest mass extinction, 252 million years ago, and could point to the risks that lie ahead in an era of similarly rapid climate change. The latest analysis, published in this week’s issue of the journal Science, puts together computer modeling of ancient ocean conditions and a close look at species characteristics to fit new pieces into a longstanding puzzle: What were the factors behind the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, also known as the Great Dying? The Permian-Triassic die-off… Read More

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