Local billionaire to take control of the LA Times Monday

LOS ANGELES — A biotech billionaire who purchased the Los Angeles Times with an eye toward restoring its independence and vigor will officially take control of the news organization Monday, the newspaper reports . Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong (soon-shong) is spending $500 million to buy The Times, San Diego Union-Tibune, Spanish-language newspaper Hoy and some community newspapers from Chicago-based Tronc. The deal, announced Feb. 7, returns The Times to local ownership after nearly two decades under rocky Chicago control. The newsroom has been led by three editors in 10 months and five publishers in four years. Soon-Shiong, 65, will become executive chairman of the California News Group. He plans to move… Read More

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She went to check her corn — and was swallowed by a python

The body of 54-year-old Wa Tiba (bottom) lies next to a python after villagers cut open the seven-metre (23-foot) snake which was found bloated in the village of Persiapan Lawela on the island of Muna, offshore of Sulawesi on June 16, 2018. The Indonesian woman was found in the belly of the giant python after the swollen snake was captured near where she vanished while tending her vegetable garden, police said. Agence France-Presse via Getty Images By Avi Selk | The Washington Post For the second time in barely more than a year, an Indonesian villager has been swallowed whole by a python. Wa Tiba, 54, left her home on… Read More

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Video: See huge nuke plant cooling towers implode

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Two cooling towers — both well over the length of a football field — came tumbling down in seconds on Saturday in Florida as part of an effort to dismantle a power plant. The identical, 462-foot towers were imploded at St. Johns River Power Park in Jacksonville. After counting backward to one, a large blast sent the towers to the ground amid wild cheers. A huge cloud of smoke and dust plumed out and engulfed nearby trees. Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our Morning Report weekday newsletter. Jacksonville Electric Authority and Florida Power &… Read More

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Police: Inmate kills Kansas deputies escorting him to court

By Kristine Phillips | The Washington Post An inmate shot and killed two sheriff’s deputies in broad daylight Friday in Kansas while they were transporting him from a Kansas City jail to a courthouse across the street for a hearing, authorities say. One of the mortally wounded deputies managed to shoot the suspect, who remains hospitalized. Deputy Patrick Rohrer died at a hospital on the same day. Deputy Theresa King died shortly after midnight Saturday. The two had a combined 20 years of service for the sheriff’s department in Wyandotte County. Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our Morning… Read More

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17 killed in stampede after brawl at crowded Caracas club

By FABIOLA SANCHEZ and CLYBURN SAINT JOHN CARACAS,Venezuela (AP) — Seventeen people were killed at a crowded nightclub in Venezuela’s capital Saturday after a tear gas device exploded during a brawl and triggered a desperate stampede among hundreds gathered for a graduation celebration, government officials said. Interior Minister Nestor Reverol said the incident at the “Los Cotorros” club in the middle-class neighborhood of El Paraiso left eight minors dead and five injured. Seven people have been detained, including the individual believed to have set off the tear gas canister. Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our Morning Report weekday… Read More

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Pictures of regret: How beloved tattoos can become an embarrassment

By Theresa Vargas | Washington Post Regrets take many forms: A missed baseball game. A failed test. A marriage proposal met with a “no.” But with time, and effort, most can be pushed out of sight, out of mind. Joe Kregel shows off a tattoo he got at age 18 and regrets. (Astrid Riecken/For the Washington Post) That is not the case with the regret that Joe Kregel tries to hide most days. But with each glance at his left wrist, he is reminded again of the very poor decision he made many years ago. There, near the crease above his palm, sits a sloppy-looking black-and-red tattoo. It is supposed… Read More

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